China’s Telecom Anti-Monopoly: What Troubles is the China National Development and Reform Commission Meeting?

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(By You Yunting) According to media reports, the officer in charge of the China National Development and Reform Commission (the “NDRC”) in a recent statement was quoted as saying that the NDRC had always, and would continue to supervise the monopoly issues in relation to broadband access provided by China Telecom and China Unicom, and that the NDRC suffered from various reactions when it announced its investigation into China Telecom and China Unicom at the end of 2011. He also said that currently the 10G of bandwidth provided by China Telecom and China Unicom had been extended to 100G, and that it would still urge China Telecom and China Unicom to rectify this issue within a period of three to five years.

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Analysis on the Anti-monopoly Dispute Filed by Qihoo against Tencent, III

(By Luo Yanjie) In our previous two posts, we introduced the reader to the facts involved in the monopoly dispute between Qihoo and Tencent, as well as the Court’s decision. Today, we continue that discussion of the case and would like to share our opinions on it.

Lawyer’s comments and analysis

It is not difficult to find from the above judgement that Qihoo lost the lawsuit mainly because the court in the first instance denied its allegation that Tencent held a dominant position in the market; ithe court’s decision was primarily based on a broad definition of “relevant market” in regard to Tencent’s QQ instant messaging software. The following is our analysis on the issue:

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Analysis on the Anti-monopoly Dispute Filed by Qihoo against Tencent, II

Today we will continue our introduction of the opinions of the Guangdong High People’s Court, the first instance court in the anti-monopoly dispute, concerning the facts in the case as well as its judgment.

II. About the dominant position of the defendant in the relevant market

As held by the court in the first instance, the plaintiff had a much narrower definition of the relevant product market and regional market, and its calculation for the market share was thus not accurate.Especially taking into account that the product scope shown was the plaintiff’s most important evidence; more importantly, that the report from the Ai Rui research institution presented data contrasting with the scope determined by the court.

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Analysis of the the Anti-monopoly Case Filed by 360 Against Tencent, I

(By Luo Yanjie) Starting today, we will have three posts introducing the decision in China’s most closely followed anti-monopoly case. Today’s post will first introduce the facts of the case. Qihoo 360 Technology Co. Ltd. (NYSE: QIHU) (“Qihoo”) is a company whose primary business is security software. In October of 2010, Qihoo released software named “360 Privacy Protector,” which was claimed to prevent QQ, the instant messenger of Tencent Holdings Limited (SEHK: 700) (“Tencent”), from uploading the user’s personal information. Tencent issued a notice to its users, demanding that users who installed QQ not install any of Qihoo’s software. At the same time it took technical steps to check the computers for any Qihoo’s software. If any Qihoo software was found, the user was not allowed to sign in to QQ. This led to a large dispute on the Internet in China. After the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (the “MIIT”) intervened, Qihoo recalled its 360 Privacy Protector, and Tencent revoked its regulation prohibiting QQ users from using Qihoo.

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Analysis on the Anti-monopoly Dispute Filed by Qihoo against Tencent, III

(By Luo Yanjie) In our previous two posts, we introduced the reader to the facts involved in the monopoly dispute between Qihoo and Tencent, as well as the Court’s decision. Today, we continue that discussion of the case and would like to share our opinions on it.

Lawyer’s comments and analysis

It is not difficult to find from the above judgment that Qihoo lost the lawsuit mainly because the court in the first instance denied its allegation that Tencent held a dominant position in the market; in addition, it’s evidence that the court’s decision was primarily based on a broad definition of “relevant market” in regard to Tencent’s QQ instant messaging software. The following is our analysis on the issue:

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Analysis on the Anti-monopoly Dispute Filed by Qihoo against Tencent, II

(By Luo Yanjie) Today we will continue our introduction of the opinions of the Guangdong High People’s Court, the first instance court in the anti-monopoly dispute, concerning the facts in the case as well as its judgment.

II. About the dominant position of the defendant in the relevant market

As held by the court in the first instance, the plaintiff had a much narrower definition of the relevant product market and regional market, and the plaintiff calculated the market share based on the relevant product and regional market as it advocated, and that could not truly reflect the share and position of the defendant in the relevant market objectively. Especially taking into account that the product scope shown was the plaintiff’s most important evidence; more importantly, that the report from the Ai Rui research institution presented data contrasting with the scope determined by the court.

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Analysis on the Anti-monopoly Dispute Filed by Qihoo against Tencent, I

(By Luo Yanjie) Starting today, we will have three posts introducing the decision in China’s most closely followed anti-monopoly case. Today’s post will first introduce the facts of the case. Qihoo 360 Technology Co. Ltd. (NYSE: QIHU) (“Qihoo”) is a company whose primary business is security software. In October of 2010, Qihoo released software named “360 Privacy Protector,” which was claimed to prevent QQ, the instant messenger of Tencent Holdings Limited (SEHK: 700) (“Tencent”), from uploading the user’s personal information. Tencent was very dissatisfied with this claim, and believed that Qihoo actually intended to steal QQ users’ information and then replace QQ with its own product. For this reason, Tencent issued a notice to its users, demanding that users who installed QQ not install any of Qihoo’s software. At the same time it took technical steps to check the computers of its users to see whether they had installed Qihoo’s software. If any Qihoo software was found, the user was not allowed to sign in to QQ. This led to a large dispute on the internet in China. After the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (the “MIIT”) intervened, Qihoo recalled its 360 Privacy Protector, and Tencent revoked its regulation prohibiting QQ users from using Qihoo.

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