Introduction to A Case on Whether OEM Would Constitute Infringement in China

Abstract:

(By Luo Yanjie) For the infringement caused by OEM in China, different courts hold different opinions in China, and in this essay you could see a case describe the infringement determination. The determination of trademark infringement should be subjected to whether or not potential consumers would be confused when making their decision to purchase the product. If the potential consumer is not confused by the product, then it should not be considered as an infringement.

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Analysis on Proof Requirements in Figurative Trademark Infringing Others’ Copyright Cases by China Court

360截图-3444018

— A trademark certificate cannot be taken as evidence of copyright ownership

(By Luo Yanjie) On June 27th 2002, Hua Yuan Company (hereinafter “Hua Yuan”) filed an application to revoke the disputed trademark “老人城LAORENCHENG” (hereinafter Lao Ren Cheng) pursuant to on Article 31 of the Trademark Law, with the claim that the trademark infringed upon Hua Yuan’s first rights in the mark. The disputed trademark was applied in Class 25 with registration number 1497462. During prosecution of the trademark, Hua Yuan submitted certificate of the No. 590673 trademark and No. 696935 trademark as evidence of its first rights in the mark. As indicated by the documents, the trademarks were registered before the trademark “Lao Ren Cheng.” Considering the opposition was mainly filed on the ground that Hua Yuan’s first rights had been infringed rather than due to similarity of the trademarks, the focus of this particular case depends on whether a trademark certificate may be treated as evidence of trademark ownership.

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What Has The UGG Trademark Application in China Told us?

—How to Comprehensively Protect Application for Famous Brands’ Trademarks

Recently some Chinese media have reported that many B2C websites such as 360buy are selling the alleged knockoff UGG snow boots. The Deckers Outdoor Corporation (the “Deckers”), the manufacturer of UGG Australia, claims its exclusive ownership of the UGG trademark and those boots promoted and sold in the name of UGG but without its license are counterfeits. In today’s post, Bridge IP Law Commentary would analyze the dispute of UGG trademark by relevant China laws and regulations.

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